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Latin America

In Rio de Janeiro, A Red Wedding For Organized Crime

At the worst possible moment for Rio, a new kind of criminal organization is moving into the city, writes Maria Martin in Brazil’s El Pais. Sophisticated, genteel, and extremely violent, the First Capital Commando appears to be too well organized for the city’s poorly equipped and underfunded police to handle.

The giveaway wasn’t a particular phone call or a specific sentence; it was the accents.

The Hero of Fort Apache

There is an extraordinary moment in a television interview with Carlos Tevez from a couple of years ago. It was 2015 and the Argentine striker had recently returned to Boca Juniors, the most celebrated club in arguably the world’s most soccer-crazed nation. The precocious Tevez had risen from abject poverty to land a spot at Boca at just 16 years old.

In the 2015 interview, the commentator, Alejandro Fantino, is peppering Tevez with questions about his neighborhood

The Goldman Murders

Environmental activism in Latin America very frequently pits indigenous local leaders against rapacious companies backed by foreign money and the full military weight of the state. As IB’s Brian Hagenbuch writes here, the separate murders of two recent winners of the prestigious Goldman Prize over the past year, in Mexico and Honduras, threw a spotlight on a much larger pattern of violence and intimidation that claimed dozens of lives in the region.

Mark Baumer’s final blog post on January 21, 2017 was morbidly prophetic.

Trump Suggests a Friendly Little Invasion

Whether Donald Trump’s suggestion he might send US troops to Mexico was a threat, as this article suggests, or a friendly offer, as the White House today claimed, the idea of US troops on the soil of a country that lost half its territory to the United States in various wars is raising a firestorm in Mexico. From Proyecto Puente, Dolia Estevez’s scoop which sent a minor shockwave through Mexico yesterday:

The President of the United States, Donald Trump, told his Mexican counterpart, Enrique Pena Nieto, that the United States does not need Mexico

The Gunman in Winter

Snapshots from the life of a Caracas street thug, retired at an early age, from Leo Felipe Campos.

He was 12 years old the only time his father asked him for a gun. That is his last memory of the father: He heard him saying through clenched teeth that someone had robbed him and he wanted revenge. The boy got him the gun.

‘That Sixty Million Americans Voted For Him Is Terrifying’

Joseph Zarate’s in-depth reporting* on the effects of natural resource extraction on indigenous communities and the land in Peru have won him a reputation as one of Latin America’s most insightful and accomplished young journalists. Here, he gives International Boulevard a glance from his vantage point on the United States as Donald J. Trump takes power.

As a Peruvian, how do you interpret Donald Trump’s victory? Did it surprise you or change how view the United States?

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